00:00-46 – single and double tonguing in different registers
00:47-end – fast-as-possible (double) tonguing

Tonguing is the articulation and/or rearticulation of phonation by means of an enunciated ta or tu, or for softer articulation, da or du. There are three main varieties—single, double, and triple—the latter two generally faster than the former, though this may not hold true for all players. Double and triple tonguing involve the alternation between ta/da (or tu/du) and ka (or ku). For example, double tonguing is performed with repetitions of ta-ka (yielding a duple emphasis), and triple, with ta-ka-ta, ta-ta-ka, or even ta-ka-ta-ka-ta-ka (yielding a ternary emphasis).

As a general note to composers, it is not necessary to specify tonguing, unless one wants to for compositional purposes. Players study this traditional technique early in their training and are used to figuring it out for themselves as part of learning a piece.

With extensive use of fast tonguing, fatigue is likely to set in and hinder a player’s ability to continue tonguing at maximum capacity. How quickly a player will tire depends on physical ability and practice regimen.

Single tonguing

Pitch range. Same as ordinario.

Dynamic range. Same as ordinario.

Maximum speed. Approximately 9–10 per second.

Double tonguing

Pitch range. Same as ordinario, though more difficult and sloppier at extremes.

Dynamic range. Same as ordinario.

Maximum speed. Approximately 12 per second and faster.

Triple tonguing

Pitch range. All registers, though more difficult and sloppier at extremes.

Dynamic range. Same as ordinario.

Maximum speed. Approximately 12 per second and faster.